Catherine Thomas

These two references are probably to the same person. She was less well-known than Margaret uch Evans

1798-1801 Caddy of Cwm Glas. (Llanberis)
This athletic female does not often visit the town of Caernarfon but whenever she does, the boys run after her and call her “the woman with the beard”. Caddy resides in Cwm Glas, a romantic vale about two miles from Llanberis.  She is accustomed to masculine employments of every description, and such is her muscular power, that no man of the village would dare to try a fall with her. Mr Jones of the Copper-mine had often rallied her on the subject of her great strength, and told her that he did not believe half the stories that he had heard related.
Mr Jones of the copper mine, had often rallied her on the subject of her great strength, and told her that he did not believe half the stories that he had heard related. She, one day, in perfect good humour, came behind him as he was standing on the bank of the pier near the stamping mill, and, lifting him from the ground, held him in her arm, though by no means a small man, with apparent ease, over the water. “Now, sir,” said she, “I suppose you will believe I am tolerably strong; you must confess it, or I shall throw you in.” He immediately acknowledged her powers, and was relieved from his predicament. A man some years ago entered her cottage during her absence, and had collected together some eatables and clothes with which he was escaping just as she returned. Though her cottage was in a very solitary situation, and she was entirely alone, she resolutely went up and insisted on his returning everything he had taken. He opened his wallet and gave up the eatables. Supposing these to be all, she returned with them to the cottage. Soon after, however, she discovered that a silk handkerchief, which she had left on the table, was gone. She immediately seized one of the bars of a small gate in her hand, and went in pursuit of the thief. She overtook him in one of the most solitary parts of the vale, and brandishing her cudgel about his ears, with the utmost courage demanded restitution of the remainder of her property. An answer she did not wait for, but seizing the bag from the cowardly fellow, shook the whole contents, with the most contemptuous air, upon the ground. When she had selected her own property, she threw the bag in the fellow’s face; and after bestowing a hearty thwack with her cudgel on each of his shoulders, left him to comfort himself with the idea of having escaped a more sound drubbing, which, as she afterwards declared, she would have inflicted had she thought it necessary.
Bingley, William, (1774-1823), North Wales including its Scenery, Antiquities, Customs and Sketches of its Natural History, delineated from two excursions through all the interesting parts of that country during the summers of 1798 and 1801, (2nd edition, 1814), 2 vols., chapter 13, pp. 158-159;
Bingley, W., Rev, Excursions in North Wales including Aberystwith and the Devil’s Bridge, intended as a guide to Tourists by the late Rev W Bingley. Third edition with corrections and additions made during Excursions in the year 1838 by his son W.R. Bingley, (London, 1839), pp. 132-133 (shorter entry than in earlier editions)

[This was repeated word for word by Rev John A Clark, an American, in his Glimpses of the Old world; or, Excursions on the Continent, and in Great Britain, Vol. 2, (London, 1840), pp. 401-402, see below]

1830
we went to see a wonderful woman who once knocked down a man. She is now about 70 years old, lives in the poorest hut imaginable though she has four cows and 300 sheep, she could not speak English but through the guide offered us some fresh milk. Her name is Catherine ?????? and she has a long beard, she kills her own sheep and is very charitable, giving her spare milk to the poor,
Rushout, Anne, Hon (1768-1849), [Tour of Wales, 1830], University of London (Senate House Library) MS682/3, volume for 1830, p. 57, 6th September, 1830 

1838

Another tourist, who visited this region about twenty years subsequent, gives an account of another female, not unlike Margaret in the general outline of her character. Her name was Caddy of Cwm Glas. Cwm Glas is a romantic vale, about two miles from Llanberis, where Caddy resided. She was accustomed to masculine employments of every description; and such was her athletic power, that no man in the village dared to encounter her as a wrestler. A gentleman, connected with the copper mine, had often rallied her on the subject of her great strength, and told her that he did not believe half the stories that he had heard related. She, one day, in perfect good humour, came behind him as he was standing on the bank of the pier near the stamping mill, and, lifting him from the ground, held him in her arm, though by no means a small man, with apparent ease, over the water. “Now, sir,” said she, “I suppose you will believe I am tolerably strong; you must confess it, or I shall throw you in.” He immediately acknowledged her powers, and was relieved from the unpleasant predicament in which he found himself. On one occasion, a huge raw-boned fellow entered her cottage during her absence, and had collected together some eatables and clothes with which he was escaping just as she returned. Though her cottage was in a very solitary situation, and she was entirely alone, she resolutely went up and insisted on his returning everything he had taken. He opened his wallet and gave up the eatables. Supposing these to be all, she returned with them to the cottage. Soon after, however, she discovered that a silk handkerchief, which she had left on the table, was gone. She immediately seized one of the bars of a small gate in her hand, and went in pursuit of the thief. She overtook him in one of the most solitary parts of the vale, and brandishing her cudgel about his ears, with the utmost courage demanded restitution of the remainder of her property. An answer she did not wait for, but seizing the bag from the cowardly fellow, shook the whole contents, with the most contemptuous air, upon the ground. When she had selected her own property, she threw the bag in the fellow’s face; and after bestowing a hearty thwack with her cudgel on each of his shoulders, left him to comfort himself with the idea of having escaped a more sound drubbing, which, as she afterwards declared, she would have inflicted had she thought it necessary. Although the females in this region generally appeared exceedingly masculine, I did not hear that there was any one now living in the valley of Llanberis equal in Herculean strength either to Caddy or Margaret ych Evan.
Clark, John A., Rev (American) Glimpses of the Old world; or, Excursions on the Continent, and in Great Britain, Vol. 2, (London, 1840), pp. 400-402

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